25 3 / 2014

americastestkitchen:

The Porterhouse Rules http://ift.tt/Qbmb6e Cook’s Country senior editor Bryan Roof slices into the tenderloin portion of an extra-thick-cut porterhouse steak cooked by test cook Morgan Bolling, right, in order to check its doneness during a test to see which surface treatments give these behemoth beef cuts the best crust without resulting in an overcooked interior. Looks like this one’s right on the money! Keep an eye out for the final technique in an upcoming issue of Cook’s Country Magazine.

americastestkitchen:

The Porterhouse Rules http://ift.tt/Qbmb6e _MG_8665Cook’s Country senior editor Bryan Roof slices into the tenderloin portion of an extra-thick-cut porterhouse steak cooked by test cook Morgan Bolling, right, in order to check its doneness during a test to see which surface treatments give these behemoth beef cuts the best crust without resulting in an overcooked interior. Looks like this one’s right on the money! Keep an eye out for the final technique in an upcoming issue of Cook’s Country Magazine.

21 3 / 2014

foodtechconnect:

It’s starting to feel like the year of the food delivery IPO…
On the heels of GrubHub Food Delivery & Takeout's $100M IPO announcement, food delivery giant Just-Eat.co.uk preps for £100M IPO.

foodtechconnect:

It’s starting to feel like the year of the food delivery IPO…

On the heels of GrubHub Food Delivery & Takeout's $100M IPO announcement, food delivery giant Just-Eat.co.uk preps for £100M IPO.

17 3 / 2014

17 3 / 2014

16 3 / 2014

fastcompany:

"In 5 years, a computer system could know what you like to eat better than you do. A machine that experiences flavor will determine the precise chemical structure of food and why people like it. Not only will it get you to eat healthier, but it will also surprise us with unusual pairings of foods that are designed to maximize our experience of taste and flavor. Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter." - How Creative Can Computers Be?

fastcompany:

"In 5 years, a computer system could know what you like to eat better than you do. A machine that experiences flavor will determine the precise chemical structure of food and why people like it. Not only will it get you to eat healthier, but it will also surprise us with unusual pairings of foods that are designed to maximize our experience of taste and flavor. Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter." - How Creative Can Computers Be?

14 3 / 2014

nbcnightlynews:

How do you celebrate Pi Day? With pie, of course!

nbcnightlynews:

How do you celebrate Pi Day? With pie, of course!

(via npr)

10 3 / 2014

greenpointers:

Mark your calendars folks, our Annual Spring Market is right around the corner! On Sunday, April 13, 2014 from 1-7pm we will transform the sun drenched Greenpoint Loft (67 West St, 5th Fl) into a  blooming herbal wonderland. As always expect food and drinks, arts and crafts, gifts, photo booth, nail art, and a terrarium class (reserve now) AND MORE!
RSVP on Facebook
Don’t you just love the poster? Libby V created it!
Click here to become a vendor.

greenpointers:

Mark your calendars folks, our Annual Spring Market is right around the corner! On Sunday, April 13, 2014 from 1-7pm we will transform the sun drenched Greenpoint Loft (67 West St, 5th Fl) into a  blooming herbal wonderland. As always expect food and drinks, arts and crafts, gifts, photo booth, nail art, and a terrarium class (reserve now) AND MORE!

RSVP on Facebook

Don’t you just love the poster? Libby V created it!

Click here to become a vendor.

05 3 / 2014

americastestkitchen:

Secrets to the Best Almond Cake You’ve Ever Had.Every European country has a version of this cake—so we developed an American one.

americastestkitchen:

Secrets to the Best Almond Cake You’ve Ever Had.

Every European country has a version of this cake—so we developed an American one.

27 2 / 2014

nycedc:


"Everyday at the market is kind of hilarious. Everyone here is a character…That’s when working at the Essex Street Market stopped being just a job. It became my community."

Over the next few months, we will be featuring the characters who make up the bustling corner of Delancey and Essex Street.
A historic culinary destination on the Lower East Side, Essex Street Market is home to more than 20 independent merchants. This week we spoke with Emilie, an employee at Heritage Meat Shop (pictured with a chicken above). The story behind the shop reflects the market’s diversity and how the people behind its businesses contribute uniquely to the NYC economy. 
Business: Heritage Meat ShopOwner: Patrick MartinsSells: Non-commodity, pasture-raised meat Been open for: Over 2 years
Who started the business and why did they want to be in the market?

Patrick Martins is the founder of Heritage Foods USA, a distribution company that sells directly to chefs, restaurants, and online customers. He started Heritage Meat Shop in 2011 after Jeffery’s Meat Market had to close its doors.
The space we occupy has actually been a butcher shop in one form or another for over 100 years. No one wanted to see Jeffery’s close and I think Patrick saw an opportunity to keep a tradition alive while also supporting his mission to make sustainably-sourced, heritage breed meat available to as many people as possible. Patrick asked Silva, who started working at Jeffery’s in 2004, to stay on board. Silva is an institution. If you don’t know him for his dry-aged steaks, then you’ll recognize him by his smile and loud voice. He likes to shout out to the crowd to hock the daily specials. That’s the official reason, but we all really suspect that Patrick was just trying to get noticed by Anne Saxelby, the owner of Saxelby Cheesemongers. I think it worked. They’re now married and have a kid together.

What is your favorite memory at the Essex Street Market?

Everyday at the market is kind of hilarious. Everyone here is a character, but if I have to choose, it would be when we first started breaking down whole animals at the shop. That’s when working at the Essex Street Market stopped being just a job. It became my community.

What is Heritage Meat Shop’s specialty? 

We sell non-commodity humanly raised meat with an emphasis on traceability. Our beef is grass fed, and all of our animals are pasture raised on small family farms.
Our pork chops are probably our most popular item. They’re a great deal, and the tastiest pork chop you’ll ever try! All of our pork is heritage breed which means they are genetically different from pigs found on commodity farms. These are the animals that historically were raised before industrialized farming came into practice.
Each breed is different, with their own unique characteristics. They vary in ways like fat content, texture, and size, but the most notable distinction is in flavor. Some breeds are creamy, with a taste that might remind you of buttermilk, while others can be described as mineraly or earthy. I’ve even had a customer point out that one breed had a red winey flavor. The fun part is experiencing the difference and coming up with your own descriptions. 
Silva, our head butcher, has his own loyal following. You really can’t beat his dry aged prime rib. We always try to keep it in stock. We also carry more exotic products like goat, geese, and bison—things that you wont find just anywhere. And of course, we have a great selection of cured meats and charcuterie.

What is your favorite time of the week at the market?

My favorite time to be at the market is Saturdays when it’s busy, when we’re really moving, or Tuesdays when we get in whole animals and break them down for the week. Every culture has thier own cuts. I love the story that’s told by the different cuts that people request. There are so many ways to butcher meat; I am ALWAYS learning more and new things.
If you ever want anything custom-cut, just call us or stop by on a Tuesday. Our number is 212-539-1111 and we are more than happy to take requests for custom cuts. 

Do you source any products from within the market? 

Do wives and families count? If they do, then I think we are winning that game. (In reference to owner Patrick Martins and Saxelby Cheesemongers owner Anne Saxelby, who are married) 

Fun facts?

We’re all from different backgrounds with a dedication to heritage breeds and the farmers who grow them. Kieran is a drummer in a band. Silva was a rancher in Brasil—a genuine gaucho. Emilie has been a farmer and a professional horseback rider. Aldo was a butcher in Mexico. And Dick is a dot-com refugee who worked with Patrick at Slow Food USA.

What’s your favorite part about Essex Street Market? Let us know in the comments. Be sure to pay Heritage Meats a visit or call to order custom cuts, (212) 539 - 1111. You can learn more about the market at the Essex Street Market website.

nycedc:

"Everyday at the market is kind of hilarious. Everyone here is a character…That’s when working at the Essex Street Market stopped being just a job. It became my community."

Over the next few months, we will be featuring the characters who make up the bustling corner of Delancey and Essex Street.

A historic culinary destination on the Lower East Side, Essex Street Market is home to more than 20 independent merchants. This week we spoke with Emilie, an employee at Heritage Meat Shop (pictured with a chicken above). The story behind the shop reflects the market’s diversity and how the people behind its businesses contribute uniquely to the NYC economy. 

Business: Heritage Meat Shop
Owner: Patrick Martins
SellsNon-commodity, pasture-raised meat 
Been open for: Over 2 years

Who started the business and why did they want to be in the market?

Patrick Martins is the founder of Heritage Foods USA, a distribution company that sells directly to chefs, restaurants, and online customers. He started Heritage Meat Shop in 2011 after Jeffery’s Meat Market had to close its doors.

The space we occupy has actually been a butcher shop in one form or another for over 100 years. No one wanted to see Jeffery’s close and I think Patrick saw an opportunity to keep a tradition alive while also supporting his mission to make sustainably-sourced, heritage breed meat available to as many people as possible. Patrick asked Silva, who started working at Jeffery’s in 2004, to stay on board. Silva is an institution. If you don’t know him for his dry-aged steaks, then you’ll recognize him by his smile and loud voice. He likes to shout out to the crowd to hock the daily specials. 

That’s the official reason, but we all really suspect that Patrick was just trying to get noticed by Anne Saxelby, the owner of Saxelby Cheesemongers. I think it worked. They’re now married and have a kid together.

What is your favorite memory at the Essex Street Market?

Everyday at the market is kind of hilarious. Everyone here is a character, but if I have to choose, it would be when we first started breaking down whole animals at the shop. That’s when working at the Essex Street Market stopped being just a job. It became my community.

What is Heritage Meat Shop’s specialty? 

We sell non-commodity humanly raised meat with an emphasis on traceability. Our beef is grass fed, and all of our animals are pasture raised on small family farms.

Our pork chops are probably our most popular item. They’re a great deal, and the tastiest pork chop you’ll ever try! All of our pork is heritage breed which means they are genetically different from pigs found on commodity farms. These are the animals that historically were raised before industrialized farming came into practice.

Each breed is different, with their own unique characteristics. They vary in ways like fat content, texture, and size, but the most notable distinction is in flavor. Some breeds are creamy, with a taste that might remind you of buttermilk, while others can be described as mineraly or earthy. I’ve even had a customer point out that one breed had a red winey flavor. The fun part is experiencing the difference and coming up with your own descriptions. 

Silva, our head butcher, has his own loyal following. You really can’t beat his dry aged prime rib. We always try to keep it in stock. We also carry more exotic products like goat, geese, and bison—things that you wont find just anywhere. And of course, we have a great selection of cured meats and charcuterie.

What is your favorite time of the week at the market?

My favorite time to be at the market is Saturdays when it’s busy, when we’re really moving, or Tuesdays when we get in whole animals and break them down for the week. Every culture has thier own cuts. I love the story that’s told by the different cuts that people request. There are so many ways to butcher meat; I am ALWAYS learning more and new things.

If you ever want anything custom-cut, just call us or stop by on a Tuesday. Our number is 212-539-1111 and we are more than happy to take requests for custom cuts. 

Do you source any products from within the market? 

Do wives and families count? If they do, then I think we are winning that game. (In reference to owner Patrick Martins and Saxelby Cheesemongers owner Anne Saxelby, who are married) 

Fun facts?

We’re all from different backgrounds with a dedication to heritage breeds and the farmers who grow them. Kieran is a drummer in a band. Silva was a rancher in Brasil—a genuine gaucho. Emilie has been a farmer and a professional horseback rider. Aldo was a butcher in Mexico. And Dick is a dot-com refugee who worked with Patrick at Slow Food USA.

What’s your favorite part about Essex Street Market? Let us know in the comments. Be sure to pay Heritage Meats a visit or call to order custom cuts, (212) 539 - 1111. You can learn more about the market at the Essex Street Market website.

26 2 / 2014

rachelfershleiser:

irisblasi:

There are likely only a few quotes about writing & soup, but pg 2 of Stock Tips has a great one from Meg Wolitzer. 
I can say without reservation: This is already the best zine about soup I’ve ever read in my life.
(P.S. If you like zines and you like soup and you like Rachel Fershleiser and Ami Greko — and, I mean, WHO DOESN’T — come to the launch party at HousingWorks on March 10.)

!!!

rachelfershleiser:

irisblasi:

There are likely only a few quotes about writing & soup, but pg 2 of has a great one from Meg Wolitzer.

I can say without reservation: This is already the best zine about soup I’ve ever read in my life.

(P.S. If you like zines and you like soup and you like Rachel Fershleiser and Ami Greko — and, I mean, WHO DOESN’T — come to the launch party at HousingWorks on March 10.)

!!!

25 2 / 2014

Check out my marketplace for vintage cookbooks

24 2 / 2014

The LEGENDARY Bern’s Steak House is having a dinner at the James Beard House this week. Chef de Cuisine Chad Johnson is a semi-finalist for this year’s Jame Beard Awards. I so wish I could be there. I had dinner at Bern’s Steak House years ago when I was in Tampa working on an engagement. Back then, I was an internal auditor for Macy’s Department Stores. The manager on the project loved Bern’s and I can see why. It was the first time I witnessed a tableside Caesar salad. The steaks were delicious. We got a tour of the kitchen. We saw the fish tank with all the fresh fish. We saw the bakery when the bread. After dinner we went upstairs to the dessert room. It was the ultimate dining experience. If you are ever in Tampa, I highly recommend going.